Crustal stress & geodynamics

Stress Map of Texas modified from Lund Snee and Zoback (2016), including additional maximum horizontal stress magnitudes from the 2016 release of the World Stress Map (Heidbach et al., 2016) and Alt & Zoback (2016). Faulting regime is shown using the AΦ system of Simpson (1997). Additional data sources are listed by Lund Snee & Zoback (2016).

Stress Map of Texas modified from Lund Snee and Zoback (2016), including additional maximum horizontal stress magnitudes from the 2016 release of the World Stress Map (Heidbach et al., 2016) and Alt & Zoback (2016). Faulting regime is shown using the AΦ system of Simpson (1997). Additional data sources are listed by Lund Snee & Zoback (2016).

I am building a high spatial resolution stress map of Texas and New Mexico with Mark D. Zoback of the Stanford Stress & Crustal Mechanics Group and the Stanford Center for Induced & Triggered Seismicity. We have so far compiled some 300 new high-quality stress orientations through partnerships with industry, and we are also mapping faulting regime (relative principal stress magnitudes). Our new data show a surprisingly variable stress field across the region, which provides an opportunity to understand the contribution of tectonic and local, geodynamic factors to stress perturbations.

We recently published a paper in Geophysical Research Letters presenting our first 200 stress orientations. The results show a surprisingly variable but coherent stress field across the area. Our stress map continues to grow, and we are currently modeling the controls to the intriguing variations that we observe.